Medicaid and Gifts

Medicaid will not pay for long term or home and community based care during a Medicaid penalty period. A penalty period will generally be imposed where uncompensated gifts have been made during the five years immediately preceding the filing of the Medicaid application. This period is known as the Medicaid lookback.  The length of the penalty period is computed based on the total amount of gifts during the look back period. Under the current Medicaid divisor, approximately one month of ineligibility is imposed for every $10,000 given away during the lookback period.

Many applicants are unaware that there is a rule, which applies to Medicaid applications filed in New Jersey after May 26, 2010, as well as to Medicaid applications filed in other states, including Ohio, preventing recalculation of the penalty period where some, but not all of the gifts made during the lookback period, were returned. The rule, as stated in New Jersey, is found in Medicaid Communication 10-06 and requires that the penalty period cannot be decreased for the returned gifts unless all of the assets given away have been returned.  This rule can have very harsh consequences, which are illustrated in a recent case from Ohio.

In Paczko v. Ohio Dept. of Job & Family Servs., (2017 OH 9024 (Oh. Ct. App., 8th Dist., Cuyahoga County, No. 105783, Dec. 14, 2017), an elderly woman transferred the sum of $146,122 to a trust, which would benefit her children. She later applied for Medicaid during the five year lookback period. The sum of $89,227.38 was returned from the trust to the elderly woman to pay for her care. She sought to reduce the original Medicaid penalty period computed on the total transfers during the preceding five years, by the sum of the returned gifts.  At the Board level, the Ohio Medicaid agency gave her limited for her returns, and denied her request for additional credit for all of the gifts returned. Her appeal was denied at both the Staff Hearing Officer and Court of Common Pleas levels.

While the Paczko case is not binding on the New Jersey courts, the case is a good illustration of what can happen when there is a partial return of gifts without further planning and a Medicaid application is filed within the five year lookback period. The take away from Paczko is that, in New Jersey, as in Ohio, applicants for Medicaid re well-advised to be mindful of the “no credit for partial returns” rule and to consult an attorney before filing any Medicaid application, or proceeding to a Medicaid Fair Hearing, to determine what solutions may be available.

Questions? Let Jane know.

 

Jane Fearn-Zimmer is a shareholder in the Elder and Disability Law, Taxation, and Trusts and Estates Groups. She dedicates her practice to serving clients in the areas of elder and disability law, special needs planning, asset protection, tax and estate planning and estate administration. She also serves as Chair of the Elder & Disability Law section of the NJSBA.

 

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